Deri-İş | Leather Coats

Deri-İş Company has aimed to be a pioneer in the leather sector since it’s establishment in 1958, Istanbul. The leather industry covers various leather products and industrial leather processes. Leather tanning involves processing of raw materials, that is, turning the skin or skin into leather and finishing, and thus can be used in the manufacture of a wide variety of consumer products. The footwear, garment, furniture, automotive and leather products industries are the most important selling points for the production of EU bronzer. Together with its business partners, Deri-Is has become one of the leading brands in the sector of ready-to-wear.

“Long hair minimizes the need for a barber; can be done without socks; a leather jacket solves the problem of chills and elegance for many years. “- Albert Einstein

The natural beauty and features of natural leather weave a tapestry that attracts us and lasts longer than other materials. This is the most important of sustainability stories – not often, but a good choice. For years, we have used sustainable practices when creating our leathers.

Research & Development

Modern technology has allowed innovation in the leather industry because the development of chemicals and sophisticated processing methods has greatly expanded leather aesthetics and feel, and possible applications. Leather continues to be the material of choice not only for commercial and residential furniture, but also for automotive, aerospace and marine applications.
62 years in the sector as Deri İş.
A meticulous experience in the fields of work safety and leather.

Work Process

The spread of the industry in the 18th and 19th centuries created a demand for new leathers, such as surrounding skins for machine use. The invention of the car created the demand for softer, lighter shoes with a stylish appearance, and an overall increase in the standard of living, a demand for soft, supple, colored leather. Traditional herbal tanned leather was very hard and thick for these requirements, and therefore the use of chrome salt was accepted and chrome tanning became the standard for modern shoes, fashion and upholstery leathers.

There are dozens of reasons to buy leather jackets. It is one of the oldest and most popular jacket styles on the market, which is based on the first bomber pilots of World War I. Leather jackets retain their value more than other jackets. So when you are ready to sell, you can get a higher price.

However, the true beauty of a leather jacket comes from its stylish look. The fine texture, classic look and bright look are unique in style. Regardless of your personal taste in fashion, you will appreciate the hereditary beauty of a real leather jacket. Go to our store and start looking for the perfect leather jacket today.

Leather is naturally one of the softest materials on the planet, so it is probably used in the production of jackets, trousers and other clothing. However, over time, it can become stiff and less comfortable to wear. However, you can counteract this phenomenon by regularly conditioning your leather jacket. Leather jackets require little ongoing maintenance, but all they need is routine conditioning with a product like Saddle Soap. Saddle Soap and similar skin care products are designed to moisturize the skin, add moisture to its pores and then prevent it from drying out. A good rule of thumb is to moisten your leather jacket with a care product like “Saddle Soap” every two to three months. This should use your leather jacket softly, flexibly and comfortably.

Leather, like all fabrics and materials, is exposed to fading. This is not something that happens overnight. On the contrary, wearing a leather jacket for months or years may eventually cause the color to fade. Some people actually prefer the look of faded leather, as it looks like an old, old look that is not found in new leather jackets and clothes. However, if you prefer the new leather look, you will be pleased to hear that this phenomenon can be avoided. The skin disappears as a result of sun exposure to strong ultraviolet (UV) rays. When exposed to sunlight for a long time, the skin turns into a softer and lighter color. For this reason, you can prevent your leather jacket from fading by limiting exposure to sunlight. This does not mean that you should keep your leather jacket in a closet throughout the day. Rather, keep it in a shady area, such as a closet that will not be exposed to the sun, or is exposed to very little.

It is known for cracking when the skin is dry. But there are a few steps you can take to protect your leather jacket from this phenomenon. First of all, it is important to note that moisture absorbs and releases moisture from its environment, depending on the level of humidity. When the skin is exposed to a moist environment, it absorbs moisture from the air and absorbs it into its pores. But when the skin is exposed to a dry environment, the opposite happens: it releases moisture. And leaving too much moisture can cause the skin to crack. Therefore, traditional wisdom should make you believe that the best way to prevent your leather jacket from cracking is to moisten it regularly, that is, something we mentioned earlier.

Of course, you can also protect your leather jacket from cracking by choosing a high-quality jacket. Some inexpensive leather jackets on the market are made with low-quality materials and workmanship that are more susceptible to cracking. By choosing a high-quality leather jacket, such as those sold at LeatherCult, you can be sure that it is protected from such damage.

Brand Report

Leather is one of the earliest and most useful discoveries of man. Our ancestors used the skin to protect themselves from the elements. Primitive man hunted wild animals for food, then made clothing, shoes and raw tents from hides. As it was then, the hides used today are a by-product. Animals are bred not for their hides, but for the meat, dairy and wool industries. About half of all leather produced today is used to make shoes, and about 35% is used for clothing.
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Leather is one of the earliest and most useful discoveries of man. Our ancestors used the skin to protect themselves from the elements. Primitive man hunted wild animals for food, then made clothing, shoes and raw tents from hides. As it was then, the hides used today are a by-product. Animals are bred not for their hides, but for the meat, dairy and wool industries. About half of all leather produced today is used to make shoes, and about 35% is used for clothing.

Leather is almost as old as human. A wearable natural second skin has provided humanity with protection, warmth and elegance for thousands of years. Is this material still up to date?

The first humans had to hunt meat (protein, iron). Even if sustainability is not known to them, animals have not wasted any of their prey as they can provide much more than food. Horns, claws and hooves; used as amulets, needles or weapons. Then they learned how to use the skin and hair. They discovered that leather washed in a pool made of old wood did not rot on the shoulders like any other. They learned how to treat them and turn them into leather. Over time, they became more competent in drying, salting and tanning, making their new second skin soft, durable and strong against the wind and bad weather.

The spread of the industry in the 18th and 19th centuries created a demand for new leathers, such as surrounding skins for machine use. The invention of the car created the demand for softer, lighter shoes with a stylish appearance, and an overall increase in the standard of living, a demand for soft, supple, colored leather. Traditional herbal tanned leather was very hard and thick for these requirements, and therefore the use of chrome salt was accepted and chrome tanning became the standard for modern shoes, fashion and upholstery leathers.

Modern technology has allowed innovation in the leather industry because the development of chemicals and sophisticated processing methods has greatly expanded leather aesthetics and feel, and possible applications. Leather continues to be the material of choice not only for commercial and residential furniture, but also for automotive, aerospace and marine applications.

Tanning

Leather tanning is the process of converting cleaned, perishable raw leather or leathers into leather to preserve its natural beauty and natural features. The most common tanning methods are Chromium and Vegetable Tanning. Chrome tanning is the most common form of tanning.

Chromed tanned leather is tanned using chrome salts. Vegetable is softer and more flexible than tanned leather and does not change color or lose its shape, as in water, like vegetable tanned leather. Chromed tanned leather is also lighter in color. Vegetable tanned skin is tanned using tannins and other natural ingredients found in trees and plants. The result is leather with more body and firmness than chrome-tanned leather.

Leathers are usually processed several times during the tanning process with agents that will increase the physical strength of the skin and ultimately provide various desired properties. This is known as “retanning”. Most of our skins are subjected to a retanning process using chrome tanning agents or a combination of both chromium and vegetable tanning agents before being dyed and finished.

Painting

Painting is the process of immersing the skin in the paint and rolling it into a rotating drum to allow the skin to penetrate the paint to the maximum.

Aniline paint is a translucent water-based paint without additional pigment. As the aniline dye is absorbed, natural signs and natural features such as scars and wrinkles appear on each skin. Since the absorption of the paint may differ from region to region, minor changes in color are usually seen in the skin, just as it changes when wood is stained. For example, loose areas of the skin typically accept more dye and look darker. These distinctive signs and nuances in texture and color should be considered as signs of natural beauty and are proof of their originality.

The semi-aniline dye has been added to a small amount of pigment or varnish to ensure that the natural properties of the post are still shown, while offering some advantages of color consistency and increased cleanability. For example, lightly pigmented skin does not show a sign like aniline dyed skin if you scratch it with your fingernail.

Dressage

In general, finishing involves any process performed after the dyeing step, such as embossing, grinding or polishing, to achieve a desired result in terms of appearance and feel for the skin. The skins are rolled in rotating drums and sprayed with a combination of heat and water mist during the grinding process.

Combination treatment of wax and oil, which penetrates the skin completely and provides natural resistance to moisture, is applied to most of our skins. These treatments are designed to reveal all the features that make the skin a truly original and natural product.

Similar to fine wood grain, each skin has numerous nature signatures that are unique. These signatures can be found in the form of healed scars, wrinkles and differences in grain. Since most of the skin does not have any artificial polish applied to the surface, natural variations in the texture are not masked or hidden. As each year passes, the leather will acquire a rich and beautiful patina with a distinctive charm and richness of character. During tanning, we use a variety of techniques to enhance the natural appearance of our skins. For example, ironing with heat and pressure creates a clear and shiny surface with the advantage of greater moisture resistance in some leathers.

For customers seeking uniform color consistency and maximum protection against wear and scratches, we offer a range of leather finished with a protective pigment or topcoat. Our goal is to provide consistent color but still provide a soft supple leather. We support almost all of our products for restaurant use, except suede and nubuck leather.